Controlling Computer Maintenance Mode in OpsMgr from the Service Manager 2012 Self-Service Portal

Extending Operations Manager 2012 maintenance mode to the Service Manager Self-Service Portal is something I’ve long thought made sense, but just needed a quiet evening with the Mrs. on the back porch to put the pieces together. Here’s a quick-and-dirty how-to with pointers to the components you need to put this together yourself and some screen captures and description of the end result.

Step 1: Build the Maintenance Mode Runbook

It all starts with a solid computer maintenance mode runbook in Orchestrator. I blogged a quick how-to for this in THE OpsMgr 2012 Server Maintenance Mode (Windows and UNIX) Runbook for Orchestrator 2012 a few weeks ago. This runbook does it all…start or stop computer maintenance, for both Windows and X-Plat computers. You can put this one together following the screen caps in that article in about 10-15 minutes.

Note: I added one little tweak to this runbook described in that article to parameterize the Windows / Unix value in Microsoft.Windows.Computer and Microsoft.Unix.Computer in the Start Maintenance Mode and Stop Maintenance Mode activities, with the intention of providing the user with a dropdown to choose between the two.  Just add an addition parameter to the Initialize Data activity (I called mine WinOrUnix) and Insert between the Microsoft..Computer in the Monitor field of your Start Maintenance Mode.

How-to at THE OpsMgr 2012 Server Maintenance Mode (Windows and UNIX) Runbook for Orchestrator 2012

Step 2: Sync Runbooks via the Orchestrator Connector

If you haven’t configured an Orchestrator Connector in Service Manager, do so and synchronize immediately. For step-by-step, see How to create an Orchestrator Connector.

Step 3:  Create Request Offering and Add to a Service Offering

You’ll need to create a few things, including: (all are links to their corresponding step-by-step on TechNet)

Note: Make sure you click Publish for both the service and request offerings

While this is not a difficult process, you need to walk through once or twice to get familiar. Travis Wright, the Godfather of Service Manager has two great videos to get you through your first time

Demo: Automating Service Request Fulfillment from the SCSM Service Catalog with Orchestrator–Real World Examples

Demo: Automating Service Request Fulfillment from the SCSM Service Catalog with Orchestrator

 

Screen Captures

Here is my end result.

I used the General category and called my Service Offering “Datacenter Operations”

image

I prep-populated as many fields as made sense.  I created simple lists for the Windows/Unix selection, Start/Stop option, and the maintenance mode reason in OpsMgr, which has to be one of about eight options  for planned maintenance.

image

Additional Resources

Hopefully this info provides some food for thought in what you can do with the Service Manager 2012 SSP. Here are a few additional articles in the ‘private cloud in the real world’ series and related System Center articles you may find interesting.

0 thoughts on “Controlling Computer Maintenance Mode in OpsMgr from the Service Manager 2012 Self-Service Portal

  1. Wilson W.

    Are you able to create a service request form that allows you to specify more than one server to put into maintenance mode?

    Can the submitter simply paste in a CSV list of server names for example? I don’t think a drop-down list is workable if you are dealing with a large number of servers….

  2. Pete Zerger Post author

    If you gave me a spreadsheet with the basic info like server name, duration, start or stop and reason, I could blog how to add a Run .Net Script on the front enf of this runbook to trigger bulk maintenance.

  3. Wilson W.

    I am thinking the typical application owner or server owner doesn’t have any awareness of what groups their servers are in…….they’re not AD admins or SysAdmins….they may be app-owners. All they know is their server names. So specifying an AD group name or SCOM group name is not going to work for them.

    I don’t envision a scenario where they would need to submit a group of servers in one request but with different start times……if that were the case then they should submit separate requests for each start time. But simply being able to submit the group of servers in a comma-delimited fashion would seem to me to be the simplest solution for users like that. I guess as a best practice you would ask them to articulate the FQDN of each server just to be on the safe side…..

  4. Pete Zerger Post author

    Not sure that’s a huge deal in this case. Also not sure providing a list of 1,000 groups (like we see in some large enterprises) is really going to be easier to deal with 🙁

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.